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Information on Bully Breeds

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Bully Descriptions

Descriptions of each bully breed

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Bull Terriers

Posted by michelletyrcha on January 17, 2013 at 10:55 AM Comments comments (0)

About The Breed

Temperament

Bull terriers are active, interested, playful clowns. Like a three-year-old child in a dog suit, they like to be DOING something. They need companionship, supervision, and physical activity. They generally love children, and can tolerate rough play. But they like to play rough, too; and need to be encouraged to be gentle. They can knock little kids down, and it’s up to adults to supervise so this can’t happen. Bullies love to be the center of attention, and are easily trained if a game appealing to their innate sense of fun can be made of the process. A militaristic approach is apt to leave both owner and dog unhappy and frustrated; these dogs have a definite “what’s in it for me” attitude, along with the eternal question: “Is it fun”? If you are seeking a lethargic “rug dog” you can ignore for days and weeks on end, a Bull Terrier is not for you. If it’s an active, fun-loving companion and loyal friend you want, a Bully just might be the answer.

Relationships With Other Animals

If they’ve been properly socialized as puppies, Bullies may get along with other dogs in neutral territory, and are not apt to start a fight. However, Bullies can react aggressively to a show of aggression from another dog. To owners who don’t read canine body language fluently, they can appear “trigger happy.” Like all terriers, both males and females refuse to be pushed around. Bullies may not be inclined to happily accept strange canines in “their” homes and yards, caution and control are always required if strangers come to visit. Males and females often get along, as do females; two males, altered or not, may be inclined to fight. Fights are serious business and must be prevented. Bull Terriers were initially bred to fight other dogs, and while some show no inclination to do so, others can hardly be discouraged. Bull Terriers can live happily with cats, if they understand that the cat is part of the household. It is common for a Bully to learn to love “his” cat, and yet cheerfully wish to murder all others.

Neutering

Neutering is advisable for the pet, and is a great kindness. Females are less subject to mammary cancer and uterine infection. They have a very brief interest in sex twice a year and the rest of the time will fight and cheerfully kill a male making sexual overtures. Pet males never get the chance to have sex, and are frustrated by that compelling itch they can not scratch. An intact male will be offensive to other animals and their owners, and very likely to his own owner as well.

Physical Aspects

Bull Terriers of both sexes are solid, muscular, and very strong. Weights vary from 40 to 75 pounds. They are a lot of dog crammed into a compact package. Ears are naturally erect (never cropped). The short coat is easy to care for by brisk brushing to remove the dead hair. Toenails need to be kept short. Vision and sense of smell are keen, and most Bullies share the terrier lightning fast, trigger sharp reflexes.

Physical Problems

Bull Terriers are vital and healthy, if free from genetic diseases. Genetic deafness occurs now and then, and luxating patella (slipping kneecaps) is also a genetic problem, causing lameness and pain for the afflicted. Surgery is sometimes successful. They are prone to heart problems of varying severity, and kidney problems (glomerulonephritis). They are subject to skin allergies, both contact, inhalation, and food. These vary widely in severity and treatability. While they are uncomfortable for the afflicted animal, they are not life-threatening. Old age (double digits) brings the usual infirmities, to which Bull Terriers are not immune – failing organs and senses, arthritis, and so forth.

About Rescue Dogs

 

Their temperament is Bull Terrier temperament. They’re the same cheerful clowns who love activity and to be doing something,who need to be part of a family. A dog past puppyhood is amenable to training, if you make it fun. Rescue dogs benefit from training, as this part of their lives has often been neglected.

Your rescue, being adult, may have had experiences that are not what a loving owner would choose, and his early socialization may have been neglected. To some extent re-conditioning is possible. These dogs need to be kept safe, to be prevented from doing harm to others while they are learning that others are no threat. They need to know that their new owners like other dogs. Sometimes, retraining isn’t possible, and the new owner has to accept that their dog just doesn’t like other dogs. Obedience training / socialization can be of great help with a rescue, and such training is recommended, so long as it is positive in nature. Bullies really don’t enjoy the militaristic approach.

Great care is suggested in introducing a rescue Bully to cats: these are strong and powerful dogs, fast as lightning. Inherent in the terrier temperament is a strong prey drive, and if a dog hasn’t been taught to accept and love all creatures, they may view kitty as “lunch.”

Any rescue Bully from our group will be neutered before you get him or her. A large part of the adoption fee you pay covers that expense. Neutering helps avoid physical problems, and helps avoid behavior problems as well. You may not show your Rescue dog in conformation, as the point of that competition is to select the best looking breeding animals. You may, however, show your rescue Bully in obedience, as well as many other performance sports (agility, for example). Neutered animals are permitted to compete in those venues.

You’ll know how big your rescue Bully is, because he or she will be an adult, and you’ll know if she or she is deaf or not, and if luixating patella is a problem or not. Your rescue will not have died from early renal failure, as more than likely he or she is “too old” for that. If he or she has a heart murmur that was discovered at the time of neutering, that will be disclosed. It is rare, and won’t be something our vets perceived to be a problem that would prevent placing the dog.

If you adopt a dog from our group, you can always contact our Help Desk. That will provide you with knowledgeable advice on a wide range of subjects. We care about the dogs, and we care about you, too. We want you to be happy with your new best friend.

America Bully Description

Posted by michelletyrcha on December 18, 2012 at 10:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The American Bully has a short, close, stiff to the touch and glossy coat. All colors and patterns are acceptable. The head of the American Bully is a medium length, deep through, broad skull, very pronounced cheek muscles, distinct stop, and high set ears. The ears can be cropped or uncropped. Eyes: all colors except albinism; Round to oval, low down in skull and set far apart. Muzzle: medium length, rounded on upper side or slightly squared to fall away abruptly below eyes. Jaws well defined. Under jaw to be strong and display biting power. Lips close and even, some looseness accepted, but not preferred. Upper teeth to meet tightly outside lower teeth in front or scissor bite accepted. Nose: all colors acceptable. The neck is heavy, slightly arched, tapering from shoulders to back of skull. No looseness of skin. Medium length. Shoulders are strong and muscular with blades wide and sloping. The back is fairly short. Slight sloping from withers to rump or straight accepted with gentle short slope at rump to base of tail. Slightly higher rears accepted, but not encouraged. The body has well-sprung ribs, deep in rear. All ribs close together. Forelegs set rather wide apart to permit chest development. Chest deep and broad. The tail is short in comparison to size, low set, tapering to a fine point; not curled. Not docked. Front legs should be straight. A slight turning outwards of the feet is accepted but not desired, large or round bones, pastern upright. No resemblance of bend in front. Hindquarters: well-muscled, let down at hocks, turning neither in nor out. Feet: of moderate size, well-arched and compact. Gait: should be springy with drive off the rear.

Temperament

The American Bully is a happy, outgoing, stable and confident dog. Gentle and loving toward people. Good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and an affectionate family pet. Almost always obedient, this dog wants nothing more than to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of life. This breed possesses the loyalty and stability of the American Pit Bull Terrier while retaining the sociable, amiable, and outgoing temperament of the American Staffordshire Terrier. This unique breed is noted for displaying extreme tolerance with children and an overwhelming eagerness to please its family. Confident, yet not aggressive, this breed possesses a very pleasant temperament. Physically, the American Bully has an impressive, athletic build, which is both muscular and defined, and displays strength and agility. The breed is versatile and capable of accomplishing a wide variety of tasks. All around, the American Bully is a well-rounded, reliable, trustworthy and ideal family companion. The breed is very outgoing with an eagerness to please. They are known for their courage. A persistent fighter if provoked. Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death if the enemy traps the dog in a corner and threatens its loved ones. This breed has a very high tolerance for pain. Socialize very thoroughly when young to curb any dog aggressive tendencies. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. This breed is not for the passive owner who does not understand that all dogs have an instinct to have a pack order. Read Top Dog. The American Bully needs an owner who is firm, but calm, confident and consistent. They need to know what is expected of them; rules to follow and limits to what they are and are not allowed to do. The objective in training and successfully keeping this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success.

 

Height, Weight

Height: Males 18 - 21 inches (46 - 53 cm)

Height: Females 17 - 20 inches (43 - 51 cm)

Weight: 70 - 120 pounds (31 - 54 kg)

There are 5 categories of the American Bully—Standard, pocket, extra-large (XL), extreme and classic. Weight and height vary greatly and are not considered important, however correct proportion of weight to height is.

 

Health Problems

-

Living Conditions

American Bullies will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefer warm climates.

Exercise

American Bullies must have plenty of regular exercise including a long brisk daily pack walk to relieve mental and physical energy.

Life Expectancy

-

Litter Size

-

Grooming

The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Brush on a regular basis with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. A rub with a piece of toweling or chamois will make the coat gleam. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The American Bully breed was established in the mid-1990s with the purpose of creating the ultimate family companion. The American Bully was created through years of selective breeding by combining the desired traits of the UKC American Pit Bull Terrier and the AKC American Staffordshire Terrier. Some lines have added other bully breeds into the mix and sometimes non bully breeds. The American Bully's origins can be seen both on the East and West Coast of the United States, primarily in Virginia and Los Angeles, California and is spreading to all parts of the U.S. Today the American Bully can also be seen in Europe and Asia. It is often confused with the American Pitbull Terrier but is clearly a different breed.

Group

Bully Breeds

AM Staff Description

Posted by michelletyrcha on December 18, 2012 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

The American Staffordshire Terrier (Am Staff) is extremely strong for its size. Agile, very muscular and stocky with a broad, powerful head. The muzzle is medium in length and rounded on the upper side to fall away abruptly below the eyes. The eyes are dark and round, low down in the skull and set far apart. Pink eyelids are considered a fault according to the AKC standard. The jaw is very strong. The lips are to be close and even, no looseness or dewlap. The ears are set high on the head and can be cropped or uncropped. Uncropped is preferred and should be short and held rose or half prick. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, stiff, glossy hair. All colors, solid, parti, or patched are permissible, but according to AKC standard it is not encouraged for dogs to be more than 80% white. The un-docked tail is short compared to the dog’s size and tapers to a point. Classed by AKC as "American Staffordshire Terrier" and by UKC as "American Pit Bull Terrier," the American Staffordshire Terrier is generally of larger bone structure, head size and weight then its cousin the American Pit Bull Terrier.

 Temperament

The American Staffordshire Terrier is an intelligent, happy, outgoing, stable, and confident dog. Gentle and loving toward people, it is a good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and affectionate family pet. It is good with children and adults. Almost always obedient, this dog wants nothing more than to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of life. Over the past 50 years, careful breeding has produced this friendly, trustworthy, dog that is an especially good dog for children. Courageous and a persistent fighter if provoked. Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death if the enemy traps the dog in a corner and threatens its loved ones. This breed has a very high tolerance for pain. Some un-socialized Staffs may be dog aggressive. Socialize very thoroughly when young to curb any dog aggressive tendencies. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. When properly trained and socialized, the Staff makes a great family companion. This breed is not for the passive owner who does not understand that all dogs have an instinct to have a pack order. They need a firm, confident, consistent owner who understands how to display proper leadership. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success.

Height, Weight

Height: Males 17 - 19 inches (43 – 48 cm) Females 16 - 18 inches (41 – 46 cm)

Weight: 57 - 67 pounds (25 - 30 kg)

Health Problems

Some are prone to heart murmurs, thyroid problems, skin allergies, tumors, hip dysplasia, hereditary cataracts and congenital heart disease.

Living Conditions

Staffordshire Terriers will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard. This breed prefers warm climates.

Exercise

Daily exercise is paramount. Without it the American Staffordshire Terrier will become hard to handle. They need to be taken on long daily walks/jogs or runs. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Life Expectancy

About 9-15 years

Litter Size

Average of 5 - 10 puppies

Grooming

The smooth, shorthaired coat is easy to groom. Brush on a regular basis with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. A rub with a piece of toweling or chamois will make the coat gleam. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

In the nineteenth century in the English region of Staffordshire, crossing among the Bulldog and various terriers developed the muscular, active, combative Staffordshire Bullterrier. Brought to the United States, the breed was preferred by American breeders who increased its weight and gave it a more powerful head. Now recognized as a separate breed, the American Staffordshire is larger and heavier than his British cousin, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. After dog fighting was banned in the United States in 1900, two strains of these dogs were developed, a show strain and a fighting dog strain. The show strain was labeled the American Staffordshire, while the fighting dog strain was labeled the American Pit Bull Terrier. The two are now being recognized as separate breeds. Today the American Pit Bull Terrier is being bred with the same gentle qualities as the American Staffordshire Terrier. They both make great pets with the right kind of owner. The American Staffordshire Terrier was recognized by the AKC in 1936. Some of the American Staffordshire Terrier’s talents are watchdog, guarding, police work, weight pulling and agility.

Group

Terrier

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Description

Posted by michelletyrcha on December 18, 2012 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a muscular dog, very strong for their size. The head is short and deep with a broad skull, short foreface, distinct stop and strong jaws. The nose is black. The teeth meet in a scissors bite. The lips should be tight and clean. The round eyes are dark in color, in relation to the coat. The somewhat small ears are either rose or half pricked. The front legs are straight. Dewclaws are sometimes removed and the paws are medium sized and well padded. The low-set tail is thicker at the base, tapering to a point, carried low. The tail should not curl much and may be likened to an old fashioned pump handle. The smooth, short coat comes in red, fawn, white, black or blue, or any of these colors with white and in any shade of brindle with or without white markings.

 Temperament

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier does everything full throttle: play, work and love. It is extremely courageous and obedient, affectionate with a sense of humor. One owner of this breed says "Staffordshire Bull Terriers are very people friendly. They are not particularly wary of strangers in almost all circumstances - although I've heard a few anecdotes about some being wary of particular people. My dogs are always happy to meet new people!". The breeds reputation with children is second to none. Adored and adoring within its own family circle. It is usually good with other pets in the household, but without a stern, human pack leader giving timely corrections when needed, they may be combative with dogs outside the family. Socialize them well. They are intelligent, persistent and active. Not a good swimmer. As a puppy they tend to chew a great deal so make sure you provide them with plenty of chew toys. Their powerful jaws will tear though vinyl toys to get to the squeaker in no time. This can be dangerous if the dog swallows the plastic. Be sure to only give your Staffie strong toys. Do not let puppies chew on human hands. Do not allow it to be off its leash unless it is safe to do so. They can be trained for agility and competitive obedience. The breed competes in agility and obedience in the UK at the highest level. Staffie's love a challenge and variety. Owners need to protect these dogs from injuring themselves. Totally fearless and curious, they're liable to jump off of a deck or walk through broken glass. They can be difficult to housebreak. These dogs are not recommended for most families, because they need every member of their family to be a firm, confident, consistent pack leader, providing rules they must follow; placing limits on what they can and cannot do. Without this, they will become stubborn and hard to handle. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success.

 

Height, weight

Height: Dogs 14-16 inches (36-41cm) Bitches 13-15 inches (33-38cm)

Weight: Dogs 25-38 pounds (11-17kg) Bitches 23-35 pounds (10-16kg)

Health Problems

Prone to cataracts. HC & PHPV (both eye complaints) although through screening of both parents this can be avoided. DNA work in the UK is very nearly complete as to cure this (people should ensure they buy from eye tested parents, and that puppies are screened at a few weeks old. Hip dysplasia is occasionally seen. Prone to mast cell tumors. Puppies are prone to having an elongated soft palate. Like all the bully type breeds, Staffordshire Bull Terriers often have gas problems.

Living Conditions

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do okay with a small yard.

Exercise

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier possesses tremendous stamina and must have plenty of exercise, which needs to include a daily walk or jog.

Life Expectancy

10-16 Years

Grooming

The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Brush every day with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. The coat will gleam if rubbed with a piece of toweling or chamois.

Origin

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier was developed in the region of Staffordshire, England in the nineteenth century from crosses between Bulldogs and various local terriers, which were similar to the Manchester Terrier. The Staffordshire Bull was developed for the then-popular sport of bull baiting. The breed's popularity waned as interest in the sport waned. Then, in the twentieth century, interest in the breed grew again, especially in the United States. It returned to the show ring in 1935. In the U.S. it is now well bred in a size slightly larger than that called for in the European standard. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is not a dog for every family, but in the hands of a dominant, experienced owner; it can be a successful pet and family guardian. The breed was recognized by the AKC in 1975.

Group

Mastiff, AKC Terrier

Pit Bull Description

Posted by michelletyrcha on December 18, 2012 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog that is extremely strong for his size. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. Docked tails are not accepted by the UKC or the ADBA. The eyes are round. Both the ADBA and the UKC do not accept blue eyes or the coat color merle. The American Pitbull Registry does accept a merle coat. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colors are admissible. The tail tapers to a point.

 Temperament

The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) has a strong pleasure to please. The APBT has evoked more human emotional, rational and irrational response than any other breed that exists today. By no means are these dogs people-haters or people-eaters. Their natural aggressive tendencies are toward other dogs and animals, not people. However if they are properly socialized with a firm, but calm, confident, consistent pack leader, they will not even be aggressive with them. The American Pit Bull Terrier is a good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and affectionate family pet that is good with children and adults. Almost always obedient, it is always eager to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of vitality. Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death. It is usually very friendly, but has an uncanny ability to know when it needs to protect and when everything is okay. The American Pit Bull Terrier can be willful with meek owners and needs a firm hand. They are generally okay with other pets if they are raised with them from puppyhood. They are very friendly, but not recommended for most people, because most people do not understand how to properly raise and treat a dog. Problems arise when one does not understand natural dog behavior, seeing the dog as having human emotions, and ends up with a dog who thinks he is the boss of the house. For a smaller, not as powerful dog, people can sometimes get away with this, however, for a powerful breed, one really needs to understand and follow this concept of keeping a dog. An excellent guide to learning how to properly treat a dog is the Dog Whisperer with Cesar Millan (recommended to all dog owners regardless of the breed they own). Excellent with children in the family, they have a high pain tolerance and will happily put up with rough child play. As with any breed, they should not be left alone with unfamiliar children. Used as all-around working farm dogs, they were referred to as "the poor man’s horse." Later they were used as fighting dogs; the powerful American Pit Bull may go for the throat of strange dogs. A minimum of training, along with the proper amount of exercise and a firm pack leader, will produce a tranquil, obedient dog. Socialize very thoroughly when young to combat aggressive tendencies and be sure to keep the dog under control when other dogs are present. Teach this dog respect for humans by not allowing it to jump up and not allowing it to enter doorways first. The humans must make the dog heel beside or behind them when walking. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. When properly trained and socialized, this is a very good dog and a great family companion. Unfortunately, some choose to promote the fighting instinct in the breed, giving it a bad name. If you would like to witness what a well-balanced Pitbull is like, tune into the Dog Whisperer and check out Daddy and Junior along with the rest of Cesar's pack of Pits. Daddy has since passed on, however there are still many episodes that air with him. R.I.P. Daddy.

 Height, weight

Height: 14 - 24 inches (35 - 60 cm)

Weight: 22 - 78 pounds (10 - 35 kg)

The American Pit Bull Terrier is both powerful and agile. Actual weight and height are less important than the correct proportion of weight to height.

A very common misconception is that APBTs are muscle-bound hulks that weigh in around 85 pounds (39 kg) or more and this is generally not the majority. Most of the APBT's that are that large have been crossed with other breeds and are being called American Bullies. The general public often gets American Bullies mixed up with the American Pitbull Terriers. American Pitbull Terrier vs. American Bully

 Health Problems

A generally healthy breed, although some are prone to hip dysplasia, hereditary cataracts, allergies to grass and congenital heart disease.

Living Conditions

Pits will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Exercise

American Pit Bull Terriers must have plenty of regular exercise and need to be taken on long daily walks.

Life Expectancy

About 12 years.

Litter Size

Average of 5 - 10 puppies

Grooming

The smooth, shorthaired coat is easy to groom. Brush regularly with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. A rub with a piece of toweling or chamois will make the coat gleam. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin Developed from the Bull and Terrier types of yesteryear, the American Pit Bull Terrier was bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull was a much loved, trustworthy companion. People who chose to train these dogs to fight are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters won't use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.

 Group

Terrier


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